Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Imperial IntoxicationAlcohol and the Making of Colonial Indochina$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Gerard Sasges

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780824866884

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824866884.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM HAWAII SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hawaii.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hawaii University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

Inheritances

Inheritances

Chapter:
(p.10) 1 Inheritances
Source:
Imperial Intoxication
Author(s):

Gerard Sasges

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824866884.003.0002

Indochina’s alcohol regime was shaped by two crucial inheritances. One was the institution of the tax farm, which allowed officials to raise revenue while consolidating a co-dependent relationship between the colonial state and ethnic Chinese enterprise. The resulting Chinese monopolies provided both a model and a target for French officials in the years to come as they created their new alcohol regime. Another inheritance was the Department of Customs and Monopolies. From the earliest days of the French presence, the Department played a central role in establishing and consolidating French control. It operated not just to actualize Indochina’s borders by implementing French customs laws, but also, by enforcing the alcohol monopoly, to actualize French rule in the lives of Indochina’s people. Much like the tax farms that preceded it, violence was a crucial part of enforcing the new alcohol regime and establishing a new French order.

Keywords:   Indochina, Vietnam, Colonialism, Chinese, Customs, tax farm, monopolies, pacification

Hawaii Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.