Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Fractal SelfScience, Philosophy, and the Evolution of Human Cooperation$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

John L. Culliney and David Jones

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780824866617

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824866617.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM HAWAII SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hawaii.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hawaii University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use.date: 16 October 2019

From Self to No-Self to All-Self

From Self to No-Self to All-Self

Chapter:
(p.149) 9 From Self to No-Self to All-Self
Source:
The Fractal Self
Author(s):

John L. Culliney

David Jones

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824866617.003.0009

Chapter 9 explores how individuals working to attain peak performance are at their best when intimately embedded and engaged in their chosen sector of the world, moving with and helping to shape its creative turbulence. Primarily focusing on the Buddhist notion of an enlightened self, we propose the sage ideally represents the fractal self with Confucian and Daoist philosophies complementing Buddhist thinkers in their conscious struggle against problems arising in selves devoted to an integrity way of being. The Buddhist self becomes the paradigmatic model for a self of intimacy. In intimacy, knowledge resides at the interface of self and world and free-will manifests in our evolved nature with our option to choose constructive engagement with our world—from family harmony to international well-being and biospheric sustainability. This chapter takes readers into discussions that may seem paradoxical, as in the concept of no-self and the sources of suffering, barriers to approaching nirvana. The Western notion of an individuated human soul dissolves into the unbounded vision of the self of intimacy that Buddhists believe is realized in traveling the “Eightfold Path.” Bash?’s poetry evokes the Path and opens vistas of compassion and enlightenment in the quest of a fractal self.

Keywords:   anatman, dukkha, nirvana, Eightfold Path, soul, Basho, compassion, free will, enlightenment

Hawaii Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.