Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Light in the Queen's GardenIda May Pope, Pioneer for Hawai'i's Daughters, 1862-1914$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Sandra E. Bonura

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780824866440

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824866440.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM HAWAII SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hawaii.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hawaii University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use.date: 18 August 2019

The Turbulent Ending of the Nineteenth Century

The Turbulent Ending of the Nineteenth Century

Chapter:
(p.176) Chapter Thirteen The Turbulent Ending of the Nineteenth Century
Source:
Light in the Queen's Garden
Author(s):

Sandra E. Bonura

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824866440.003.0014

In 1898, a series of explosive events led to the U.S. declaring war on Spain. A multitude of soldiers were in the port when the news came that President McKinley had signed the resolution annexing Hawai‘i. Frances Parker, visiting the school, witnessed Pope’s private rebellion, by asking girls to boldly sing their kingdom’s patriotic songs in their native tongue while their Hawaiian flag was removed. Annexation was a divisive issue at the school; it placed Pope on one side and the parents on the other. Pope, while deeply sympathetic to the plight of the country and the Hawaiian culture she had come to love, was well aware that this year of annexation, she would need to teach her girls more than history or literature; she would have to teach them to be Americans in Hawai‘i. Like the girls, Pope had torn allegiances and conflicting emotions, but it would be up to her to motivate the girls, despite their collective sadness over the demise of their sovereign nation.

Keywords:   Annexation, Hawaiian Flag Removal, President McKinley, Frances Parker

Hawaii Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.