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Youth for NationCulture and Protest in Cold War South Korea$
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Charles R. Kim

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780824855949

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824855949.001.0001

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Miracles Every Day?

Miracles Every Day?

Chapter:
(p.176) Chapter Six Miracles Every Day?
Source:
Youth for Nation
Author(s):

Charles R. Kim

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824855949.003.0007

April 19th, an extraordinary outburst in the mold of the paradigmatic March First Independence Movement (1919), took place in and through the transposition of memories of anticolonial resistance to postcolonial politics. Following the overthrow of the Rhee-LP regime, many public observers truly believed that the student protestors – and, by extension, South Koreans – had turned the corner out of the postwar crisis and into a new era of national history. This chapter examines post-event discourse on how to parlay the “spirit of April 19th” into a forward-looking program of wholesome modernization that effectively linked developmental policies of the democratic state to the everyday endeavors of upstanding citizens. It then turns to the aftermath of the May 16th military coup of 1961 to scrutinize Park Chung Hee’s partial assimilation of post-April 19th optimism into his ideological program during the incipient phases of his nineteen-year rule.

Keywords:   April Revolution, discourse, film, ideology, May 16th coup, narrative, Park Chung Hee, propaganda

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