Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Japanese Feminist DebatesA Century of Contention on Sex, Love, and Labor$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ayako Kano

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780824855802

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824855802.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM HAWAII SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hawaii.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hawaii University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use.date: 29 November 2020

Labor of Love, Love of Labor

Labor of Love, Love of Labor

Debates on Motherhood and Work

Chapter:
(p.104) Chapter 4 Labor of Love, Love of Labor
Source:
Japanese Feminist Debates
Author(s):

Ayako Kano

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824855802.003.0004

Chapter 4 considers debates about women’s labor in modern Japan: It begins with the “motherhood protection” debates in the 1910s involving Yosano Akiko and Hiratsuka Raichō. It continues with the “housewife debates” from the 1950s analyzed by Ueno Chizuko. It also involved valorization of housework and Kanō Mikiyo’s call for “total withdrawal” from the workplace. The debate about the value of paid wage labor and workplace equality culminated in the Equal Employment Opportunity Law (EEOL) of 1985. The “Agnes debate” involved discussions about childcare, motherhood, and careers. Recent debates about the declining birthrate and work-life balance ask whether the state should support single individuals or families, and how to evaluate paid and unpaid work. The chapter also asks how to develop an ethics of care and a feminism for the weak and vulnerable, rather than for the strong elite.

Keywords:   Japan, women, feminism, EEOL, housewife, equality, employment, childcare, housework, care

Hawaii Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.