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Nomads as Agents of Cultural ChangeThe Mongols and Their Eurasian Predecessors$
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Reuven Amitai and Michal Biran

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780824839789

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824839789.001.0001

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Steppe Land Interactions and Their Effects on Chinese Cultures during the Second and Early First Millennia BCE

Steppe Land Interactions and Their Effects on Chinese Cultures during the Second and Early First Millennia BCE

Chapter:
(p.10) Two Steppe Land Interactions and Their Effects on Chinese Cultures during the Second and Early First Millennia BCE
Source:
Nomads as Agents of Cultural Change
Author(s):

Gideon Shelach-Lavi

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824839789.003.0002

This chapter suggests that the steppe was a principal venue and transit route for substantial contacts between the Eurasian continent’s western and eastern parts during the late second and early first millennia BCE. This was a formative period for inter-regional contacts, which predate the formation of the so-called “silk route”. The paper addresses questions such as what were the routes of interaction and who were the likely bearers of influence? And how did these intercontinental reciprocities affect societies living in what are now the lands of China?

Keywords:   Bronze age, bronze artifacts, long-distance contacts, identity, Shang, Zhou, Upper Xiajaidian, early China, Silk Roads, Eurasian interactions

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