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I Ulu I Ka 'AinaLand$
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Jonathan Osorio

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780824839772

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824839772.001.0001

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‘O Koholālele, He ‘Āina, He Kanaka, He I‘a Nui Nona ka Lā: Re-membering Knowledge of Place in Koholālele, Hāmākua, Hawai‘i

‘O Koholālele, He ‘Āina, He Kanaka, He I‘a Nui Nona ka Lā: Re-membering Knowledge of Place in Koholālele, Hāmākua, Hawai‘i

Chapter:
(p.76) ‘O Koholālele, He ‘Āina, He Kanaka, He I‘a Nui Nona ka Lā: Re-membering Knowledge of Place in Koholālele, Hāmākua, Hawai‘i
Source:
I Ulu I Ka 'Aina
Author(s):

Leon No‘eau Peralto

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824839772.003.0008

When sugar companies began clearing the fertile lowlands of Koholālele in the mid to late 1800s to make way for the expansion of sugarcane production on the island of Hawaiʻi, a process of erasure commenced, which has endured to this day. Erasure—the process of completely removing something from existence or memory—does not occur instantly. It occurs over generations, on the ʻāina and in the minds of a people, as communities or nations are dismembered, and as people and their moʻolelo are displaced from the ʻāina of their origins. This chapter demonstrates some of the ways in which research, done within an ʻŌiwi context, can serve to counter processes of erasure by empowering us as a lāhui to re-establish an intimate understanding of the depth of knowledge embedded within our own kulāiwi. This ancestral knowledge forms the roots that connect us as ʻŌiwi, both physically and spiritually to our kulāiwi—the roots that hold us firmly in place through the most turbulent of times.

Keywords:   Hawaiian culture, Hawaiʻi, sugarcane production, erasure, research, ancestral knowledge

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