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The Art of Censorship in Postwar Japan$
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Kirsten Cather

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780824835873

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824835873.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM HAWAII SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hawaii.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hawaii University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use.date: 20 October 2021

A Picture’s Worth a Thousand Words

A Picture’s Worth a Thousand Words

In the Realm of the Senses (1976–1982)

Chapter:
(p.197) Chapter 7 A Picture’s Worth a Thousand Words
Source:
The Art of Censorship in Postwar Japan
Author(s):

Kirsten Cather

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824835873.003.0008

This chapter studies Ōshima Nagisa’s In the Realm of the Senses, as well as its censorship trial. The book is divided into three discrete sections: first, twenty-four 7-by-10-inch color still photographs; second, the original screenplay that was distributed to the actors and staff prior to making the film; and third, several essays of criticism by Ōshima. In the tersely worded indictment, twelve of these photos and nine passages of the screenplay were identified as obscene. Japanese-film scholar Aaron Gerow noted in an article on the Realm trial, that the “obscenity[of the book]comes not from the text itself, but rather from the reception of that text.”

Keywords:   Ōshima Nagisa, In the Realm of the Senses, obscene, Aaron Gerow, Realm trial

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