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Mainstream Culture RefocusedTelevision Drama, Society, and the Production of Meaning in Reform-Era China$

Xueping Zhong

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780824834173

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824834173.001.0001

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(p.201) Bibliography

(p.201) Bibliography

Source:
Mainstream Culture Refocused
Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press

Bibliography references:

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