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Cries of Joy, Songs of SorrowChinese Pop Music and Its Cultural Connotations$
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Marc L. Moskowitz

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780824833695

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824833695.001.0001

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Mandopop Under Siege

Mandopop Under Siege

Culturally Bound Criticisms of Taiwan’s Pop Music

Chapter:
(p.102) Chapter 7 Mandopop Under Siege
Source:
Cries of Joy, Songs of Sorrow
Author(s):

Marc L. Moskowitz

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824833695.003.0007

This chapter examines the cultural biases embedded in critiques of Mandopop. In the 1980s and early 1990s, Taiwan's popular music swept across China. Many in the PRC government reacted to the values embedded in Taiwan's lyrics with mistrust and disdain, expressing a fear that Taiwan and Hong Kong's cultural incursion would result in the PRC's loss of national identity. In Taiwan, people complained of Mandopop's fast pace and changing nature and linked this to similar trends in Taiwan's society. More recently, several Taiwanese scholars have critiqued Mandopop for promoting patriarchal gender roles, and English-language publications complain of a lack of individualism in that songs are produced in teams of composers, lyricists, and performers. The chapter examines the cultural contexts of these critiques in order to obtain a better understanding of what is, after all, the most popular Chinese-language music in the world.

Keywords:   cultural bias, Mandopop, Mandarin Chinese pop music, popular music, Taiwan, China

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