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Glamour in the PacificCultural Internationalism and Race Politics in the Women's Pan-Pacific$
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Fiona Paisley

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780824833428

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824833428.001.0001

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Decolonizing the Women’s Pan-Pacific

Decolonizing the Women’s Pan-Pacific

Chapter:
(p.63) Two Decolonizing the Women’s Pan-Pacific
Source:
Glamour in the Pacific
Author(s):

Fiona Paisley

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824833428.003.0002

This chapter looks at contradictory efforts made by the newly formed Pan-Pacific Women's Association (PPWA) toward decolonizing its own practices and attracting greater numbers of women of the Pacific nations into its ranks. Western women's experience of this process was contemporaneous with the dissipation of British imperialism's previous hegemony and its replacement with Anglo-American cooperation. For British and US women, and for women from Canada, New Zealand, and Australia, this sense of renewed authority in the Pacific would be differently felt. But more pointedly it was the direct involvement of increasing numbers of non-Western women that shifted their notions of the Oriental woman's role in the Pan-Pacific and heralded the involvement of Polynesia in shaping their worldview. The chapter investigates the rearticulation of the PPWA's logics of “East meets West” as it welcomed a range of Pacific island cultures within its cultural internationalist project.

Keywords:   decolonizing process, Pan-Pacific Women's Association, PPWA, Oriental women, Western women, decolonization

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