Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
A Beggar's ArtScripting Modernity in Japanese Drama, 1900-1930$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

M. Cody Poulton

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780824833411

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824833411.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM HAWAII SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hawaii.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hawaii University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use.date: 26 November 2021

Akita Ujaku

Akita Ujaku

The Skeletons’ Dance

Chapter:
(p.134) Akita Ujaku
Source:
A Beggar's Art
Author(s):

M. Cody Poulton

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824833411.003.0008

This chapter provides a translation for Akita Ujaku's The Skeletons' Dance—one of the first works to address the slaughter of Koreans after the 1923 earthquake. The Skeletons' Dance does not portray the earthquake itself; it is set some hundreds of miles away from Tokyo, in an evacuation tent at “M” (Morioka?) Station. Here Ujaku is less interested in a realistic rendering of the disaster than in capturing its political, social, and spiritual effect; hence his call for a “liberation of subjectivity.” In his directions, Ujaku indicates that “Cubist staging could be employed here. It might be interesting to try the 'Mavo' style,” with “Mavo” referring to a constructivist movement initiated by Murayama Tomoyoshi, Ogata Kamenosuke, Yanase Masamu, and others.

Keywords:   Akita Ujaku, The Skeletons' Dance, Korean massacre, Great Kantō Earthquake, 1923 earthquake, liberation of subjectivity

Hawaii Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.