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Making Modern MuslimsThe Politics of Islamic Education in Southeast Asia$
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Robert W. Hefner

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780824832803

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824832803.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM HAWAII SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hawaii.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hawaii University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use.date: 15 October 2019

Islamic Education in the Philippines

Islamic Education in the Philippines

Political Separatism and Religious Pragmatism

Chapter:
(p.205) 6 Islamic Education in the Philippines
Source:
Making Modern Muslims
Author(s):

Thomas M. McKenna

Esmael A. Abdula

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824832803.003.0006

This chapter argues that the conflict in southern Philippines has not led to any serious radicalization of Islamic education. On matters of religious schooling, parents and educators alike show a level-headed pragmatism. Parents appreciate Islamic education for its ability to instill piety and a religious identity in an unstable world in which neither can be taken for granted. At the same time, parents want their offspring to acquire marketable skills. Islamic schools aim to strike a balance between these two valued ends. No less surprising, and again notwithstanding the thirty-year insurgency, no political party or umbrella organization has been able to seize control of the decentralized religious school system. Until the recent establishment of the Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao (ARMM), Islamic schooling was managed at the local level, and school directors were justly famous for their independent-mindedness.

Keywords:   Islamic education, Islamic schools, southern Philippines, radicalization, Philippine Muslims, educational system

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