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How Zen Became ZenThe Dispute over Enlightenment and the Formation of Chan Buddhism in Song-Dynasty China$
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Morten Schlütter

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780824832551

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824832551.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.175) Conclusion
Source:
How Zen Became Zen
Author(s):

Morten Schlütter

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824832551.003.0009

This conclusion discusses the sectarianism seen in Dahui and other Linji masters. The apex of the rise of the new Caodong tradition coincided with a time when the Chan school as a whole had begun to feel itself under pressure and had become more dependent on support from the literati. This helps to explain why the reinvented Caodong tradition may not have been regarded as a welcome addition by the other Chan traditions and why it may have seen an early need to differentiate itself from the dominant Linji tradition by shifting to a more sectarian mode and developing a distinctive teaching that could appeal to literati. It also suggests that the Linji tradition's attacks on the Caodong teachings were mainly directed toward members of the literati rather than toward monastics.

Keywords:   sectarianism, Dahui, Linji masters, Caodong tradition, Chan school, literati, Linji tradition, Caodong teachings

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