Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Dark WritingGeography, Performance, Design$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Paul Carter

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780824832469

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824832469.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM HAWAII SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hawaii.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hawaii University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use.date: 08 December 2021

The Interpretation of Dreams: Mobilizing the Papunya Tula Painting Movement, 1971–1972

The Interpretation of Dreams: Mobilizing the Papunya Tula Painting Movement, 1971–1972

Chapter:
(p.103) Chapter 4 The Interpretation of Dreams: Mobilizing the Papunya Tula Painting Movement, 1971–1972
Source:
Dark Writing
Author(s):

Paul Carter

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824832469.003.0005

This chapter examines the beginnings of the Western Desert Painting movement at Papunya in central Australia in 1971–1972. The paintings that came out of that place and time—as well as a number of the artists—are world-famous now, but the role played by Geoffrey Bardon, the white teacher who facilitated this extraordinary event, is little known. Far from standing outside the creative situation, Bardon cast himself in the role of instigator, play-actor, provocateur, and collector. He realized that the so-called dot-and-circle style of painting embodied a profoundly non-linearist conception of the environment and of human obligations to it, and that these were rooted in a conviction that the human and non-human worlds were unified through movement forms that were at once mythological, participatory, creative, and recreative. Ultimately, the key point of the Papunya drawings was that they were both plans, or maps of place, and traces of passage.

Keywords:   Western Desert Painting movement, Geoffrey Bardon, dot-and-circle style, movement forms, Papunya drawings

Hawaii Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.