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Hawaii at the Crossroads of the U.S. and Japan before the Pacific War$
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Jon Thares Davidann

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780824832254

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824832254.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM HAWAII SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hawaii.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hawaii University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use.date: 25 September 2021

In the Strong Wind of the Americanization Movement

In the Strong Wind of the Americanization Movement

The Japanese-Language School Litigation Controversy and Okumura’s Educational Campaign

Chapter:
(p.217) Chapter 9 In the Strong Wind of the Americanization Movement
Source:
Hawaii at the Crossroads of the U.S. and Japan before the Pacific War
Author(s):

Mariko Takagi-Kitayama

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824832254.003.0010

This concluding chapter discusses the controversies arising from the “Americanization” of Japanese in Hawai‘i. In the eyes of white society leaders, the Japanese were not adopting the “American way of life.” Americanizers criticized the language schools strongly for imbuing the young Nisei, American citizens by birth, with Japanese culture and nationalism From the viewpoint of the Japanese immigrants, however, the Americanization pressure was unacceptable since they were unwilling to abandon their language and culture. The Japanese leaders took the bold step of filing a lawsuit to challenge Hawai‘i's legislation controlling the schools, and accused the litigation group of adding to tensions between Japanese and Americans.

Keywords:   Americanization, Americanizers, Japanese culture, Japanese leaders, Nisei

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