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Down and Out in Late Meiji Japan$
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James L. Huffman

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780824872915

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824872915.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM HAWAII SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hawaii.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hawaii University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use (for details see www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 16 December 2018

Making a Life

Making a Life

At Home

Chapter:
(p.99) Chapter 4 Making a Life
Source:
Down and Out in Late Meiji Japan
Author(s):

James L. Huffman

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824872915.003.0005

Here, the focus is on the nature of daily life at home. Beginning with a “typical” August 1901 day in the “Ueki” household, the chapter shows that the effort to survive was framed by great struggle and even greater ingenuity. A section on the household shows fluidity and variety in family arrangements, with increasing stability as the era passed. Children sometimes roamed freely on the streets but most of the time they worked for pay, to enable the family to survive; few were able to go to school. Food was basic, and families bought from leftover food shops; the hinmin did, however, include alcohol in their budgets and they frequented cheap restaurants, including izakaya or grog shops. When things got especially tight, families took out loans, often at usurious rates, and resorted to the ubiquitous pawnshops (shichiya). Only a few received charity or assistance.

Keywords:   Household, Children, Leftover food shops, Izakaya (grog shop), Shichiya (pawn broker), Charity

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