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HomingAn Affective Topography of Ethnic Korean Return Migration$
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Ji-Yeon O. Jo

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780824867751

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824867751.001.0001

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Negotiating Transborder Kinship

Negotiating Transborder Kinship

Family, Market, and Migration

Chapter:
(p.152) Chapter 7 Negotiating Transborder Kinship
Source:
Homing
Author(s):

Ji-Yeon O. Jo

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824867751.003.0008

I investigate how the interplay between legal-juridical notions of citizenship and socioculturally mediated belonging affects the family lives of return migrants, as well as how and why transborder ties between returnees and their kin have been maintained or broken. I pay special attention to the production of transborder kinship by paying heed to the lives of families across and within nation-state borders. Here, family composition and living arrangements, especially those involving parents and children, often defy normative understandings of family. I investigate how such arrangements have been necessitated by the transnational movements of my interlocutors and their affective connections with each other and with the Korean nation. And though returnees maneuver their locations in time and space in order to accommodate their family lives, their family lives have nevertheless been interrupted by their migration to South Korea, which has repercussions for their affective topographies.

Keywords:   transborder kinship, market, migration, family separation

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