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HomingAn Affective Topography of Ethnic Korean Return Migration$
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Ji-Yeon O. Jo

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780824867751

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824867751.001.0001

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Enterprising State and Entrepreneurial Self

Enterprising State and Entrepreneurial Self

Contested Citizenship in Neoliberal South Korea

Chapter:
(p.98) Chapter 5 Enterprising State and Entrepreneurial Self
Source:
Homing
Author(s):

Ji-Yeon O. Jo

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824867751.003.0006

I trace how conceptions of citizenship have transformed in post-1990 South Korea, focusing on the major formations of and shifts in Korean citizenship, as well as on the evolution of nationality laws concerning diaspora Koreans. I also examine legacy migrants’ perspectives on citizenship and legal belonging. The process of citizen-making, which unfolds through the dynamics between an “enterprising” South Korean state and the “entrepreneurial” strategies incorporated by the legacy migrants in this study, largely rests on the interplay between emotionally charged ethnic nationalism and economic mobility driven by neoliberal global capitalism, both of which in turn have rearticulated and reconfigured the borders of South Korean citizenship and belonging. As a result, various forms of conditional and contingent citizenship—statuses that are neither fully admitted by the state nor fully committed to by returnees—have been produced.

Keywords:   citizenship, nationality law, legal belonging, global capitalism, neoliberalism

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