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HomingAn Affective Topography of Ethnic Korean Return Migration$
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Ji-Yeon O. Jo

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780824867751

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824867751.001.0001

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Koreans in China

Koreans in China

Chapter:
(p.27) Chapter 1 Koreans in China
Source:
Homing
Author(s):

Ji-Yeon O. Jo

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824867751.003.0002

I trace the sociopolitical history of Korean Chinese, illustrating the pathways they took to become Chinese citizens while negotiating their national minority status as ethnic Koreans. Relative to other diaspora Koreans, Korean Chinese have succeeded to a remarkable degree at maintaining the Korean language and cultural traditions; this is primarily due to the communal living that they were able to sustain due to the Chinese government’s tolerant ethnic policy, which allowed not only the establishment of the Yanbian Autonomous Prefecture, but also ethnic education via the Korean language. Nevertheless, their status as diasporans residing near the national border with the ancestral homeland yet largely prohibited from “returning” has created an affective condition of “longing” among the Korean Chinese, a longing which has been intergenerationally transmitted through family stories, metaphorical teachings, and cultural traditions.

Keywords:   Korean Chinese, national minority policy, minority education, longing

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