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Trans-Pacific Japanese American StudiesConversations on Race and Racializations$
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Yasuko Takezawa and Gary Y. Okihiro

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780824847586

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824847586.001.0001

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The Making of a Japanese American Race, and Why Are There No “Immigrants” in Postwar Nikkei History and Community?

The Making of a Japanese American Race, and Why Are There No “Immigrants” in Postwar Nikkei History and Community?

The Problems of Generation, Region, and Citizenship in Japanese America

Chapter:
(p.257) Chapter 11 The Making of a Japanese American Race, and Why Are There No “Immigrants” in Postwar Nikkei History and Community?
Source:
Trans-Pacific Japanese American Studies
Author(s):

Eiichiro Azuma

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824847586.003.0012

This study examines how orthodox narratives of Japanese American experience in popular and academic discourse have contributed to the skewed way in which the membership of Japanese America has been defined and its boundaries cemented since the 1910s. That process entails glorification and demonization of certain types of Japanese Americans as well as exclusion of other individuals from the race history. Based on the accumulated effects of such discursive contrivances, the established notions of community, identity, history, and indeed race in contemporary Japanese America have affirmed and even encouraged the marginalization of anomalous historical agents—like Kibei—while rendering others—like postwar immigrants—as perpetual co-ethnic foreigners.

Keywords:   Nikkei history, Community formation, anti-Japanese agitation, Issei, Nisei, Sansei, Shin Issei, War Brides, West Coast, East of California, Hawaii

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