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Hawaii's Scenic RoadsPaving the Way for Tourism in the Islands$
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Dawn E. Duensing

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780824839284

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824839284.001.0001

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Hawai‘i Drives Its Way into the Union

Hawai‘i Drives Its Way into the Union

Chapter:
(p.66) Chapter Three Hawai‘i Drives Its Way into the Union
Source:
Hawaii's Scenic Roads
Author(s):

Dawn E. Duensing

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824839284.003.0004

The mundane issue of roads helped clarify one of the most important questions of Hawai`i’s years as a U.S. territory: What was its status within the Union? In 1900 Congress organized a government for Hawai`i and diverted its customs collections to the US Treasury, exacerbating the territory's financial situation. Hawai`i subsequently had insufficient funds for infrastructure and other programs, including many that had customarily been federal responsibilities. Key leaders—delegate to Congress Kalaniana`ole, governors, and Lorrin Thurston—recognized that Hawai`i’s legal right to federal appropriations were guaranteed by the Organic Act. From 1906 until 1924 they worked to recapture some of the taxes paid to Washington. Roads played a critical role in these efforts, which culminated in the Hawai`i Bill of Rights, and helped convince Congress to grant federal appropriations, especially Federal Highway Aid. Hawai`i stepped on the path to greater economic and political ties with the United States and eventually, statehood.

Keywords:   history, politics, Hawai`i Bill of Rights, Organic Act, Congress, Federal Highway Aid, roads, Jonah Kūhiō Kalanianaole, Wallace R. Farrington, US possessions

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