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Women Pre-ScriptedForging Modern Roles through Korean Print$
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Ji-Eun Lee

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780824839260

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824839260.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM HAWAII SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hawaii.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hawaii University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 16 December 2017

Project Woman, Destination Home

Project Woman, Destination Home

Chapter:
Chapter Three Project Woman, Destination Home
Source:
Women Pre-Scripted
Author(s):

Ji-Eun Lee

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824839260.003.0004

The period considered in this chapter (1905-1910) is the semi-colonial era, a time when Koreans searched for quick routes to modernization and to regaining the nation’s independence. As part of that search, Enlightenment thinkers pondered and discussed the categories of “women’s knowledge” and “home” through articles in several magazines published during this period. T’aegŭk hakpo includes Yun Chŏng-wŏn’s writings, and thus has the distinction of carrying the first public woman’s voice. Two short-lived magazines, Kajŏng chapchi (1906-8) and Yŏjajinam (1908) were designed to serve as self-study textbooks and provide glimpses of the kind of information selected as appropriate for women, and the mode of delivery for this information. Illustrations, script choice, and ideological implications inferred from the articles show a hybrid of Korean tradition and Western knowledge, but also demonstrate an underlying conservatism.

Keywords:   T’aegŭk hakpo, Kajŏng chapchi, Yŏjajinam, Yun Chŏng-wŏn, textbooks for women, Japanese Protectorate regime

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