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HuihuiNavigating Art and Literature in the Pacific$
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Jeffrey Carroll, Brandy Nalani McDougall, and Georganne Nordstrom

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780824838959

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824838959.001.0001

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All Things Depending

All Things Depending

Renewing Interdependence in Oceania

Chapter:
(p.210) Chapter Sixteen All Things Depending
Source:
Huihui
Author(s):

Jonathan Kay Kamakawiwo‘ole Osorio

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824838959.003.0017

This chapter presents Jonathan Kay Kamakawiwo‘ole Osorio’s Distinguished Lecture, delivered in February 2011 during the Association for Social Anthropology in Oceania’s annual meeting held in Honolulu. Osorio opens by singing a mele inoa, a song that he himself composed. He then discusses the web of interdependencies within which Kānaka Maoli live and that reach out laterally to an extended ohana of family members but also vertically to ancestors and descendants. He argues that Kānaka must understand that the ultimate freedom is freedom from want, the ultimate security is sharing, the ultimate power is aloha. He expands the definition of community to include all the Indigenous peoples of the Pacific and emphasizes that by uniting their voices, this collective community can navigate its people. As a postscript, Osorio offers a second composition with which he closed his lecture in Honolulu.

Keywords:   lecture, Jonathan Kay Kamakawiwo‘ole Osorio, Oceania, mele inoa, Kānaka Maoli, freedom, aloha, Indigenous peoples, Pacific, community

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