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HuihuiNavigating Art and Literature in the Pacific$
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Jeffrey Carroll, Brandy Nalani McDougall, and Georganne Nordstrom

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780824838959

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824838959.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM HAWAII SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hawaii.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hawaii University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 23 November 2017

The Many Different Faces of the Dusky Maiden

The Many Different Faces of the Dusky Maiden

A Context for Understanding Maiden Aotearoa

Chapter:
(p.144) Chapter Twelve The Many Different Faces of the Dusky Maiden
Source:
Huihui
Author(s):

Jo Smith

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824838959.003.0013

This chapter provides a broader context for understanding Maiden Aotearoa, a photography exhibit held at the Wellington City Gallery in New Zealand on May 21–June 26, 2011. Maiden Aotearoa features works by four Māori women artists—Vicky Thomas, Suzanne Tamaki, Aimee Ratana, and Sarah Hudson. The collection demonstrated a range of approaches to representing Indigenous worlds and women. This chapter examines the two meanings of Maiden Aotearoa: one refers to campaigns promoting products “made in” New Zealand and the other refers to the Dusky Maiden stereotype. It considers the key characteristics of the Dusky Maiden dynamic and how it helps cloak ongoing forms of social regulation and contributes to an “aesthetics of investment space.” It also discusses the ways in which Indigenous cultures are inextricably linked to land, place, whanau, and community as embedded in the term “tangata whenua” (people of the land).

Keywords:   photography exhibit, New Zealand, Maiden Aotearoa, Māori women, Māori artists, social regulation, Indigenous culture, whanau, tangata whenua

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