Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Lost TerritoriesThailand's History of National Humiliation$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Shane Strate

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780824838911

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824838911.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM HAWAII SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hawaii.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hawaii University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 23 March 2018



The Idea of “Loss” in Thai Historical Narratives

(p.1) Introduction
The Lost Territories

Shane Strate

University of Hawai'i Press

Thai nationalist historiography has developed into two well-established narratives. Royal-Nationalist perspective embraces themes of independence, cultural adaptation, bamboo diplomacy, and the virtues of the monarchy, to celebrate Thailand’s successful efforts at modernization. This book studies the alternative narrative, known as National Humiliation discourse, which is built on past grievances such as military defeat, territorial concessions, economic servitude and diplomatic betrayal. The narrative attempts to redefine Thai identity based on the model of the state as victim. Politicians have used this historical approach to mobilize public support for irredentism, economic and religious nationalism, and the conflict over Preah Vihear.

Keywords:   Royal-Nationalism, National Humiliation, Thailand, national identity, Franco-Siamese crisis

Hawaii Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.