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Nothingness and DesireA Philosophical Antiphony$
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James W. Heisig

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780824838850

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824838850.001.0001

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The East-West Divide

The East-West Divide

Chapter:
(p.121) The East-West Divide (p.122)
Source:
Nothingness and Desire
Author(s):

James W. Heisig

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824838850.003.0006

This chapter analyzes the East–West divide in philosophy. It argues that comparative philosophy and East–West philosophical dialogues are a temporary crutch to make the best of the divide. They are not a permanent goal or a primary means of transportation. As an initial response, these disciplinary measures can give a “feel” for what it is like to overcome the divide, but they cannot be expected to disassemble it or present an alternative. The deliberate attempt to engineer a methodological compass of all the philosophies of the world is not the way to proceed in any case. East–West modes of thought are best left to fade into the wings on their own, yielding to the light of more urgent problems that press on the philosopher's conscience.

Keywords:   East–West divide, Eastern philosophy, Western philosophy, philosophical antiphony, comparative philosophy

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