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Gender on the EdgeTransgender, Gay, and Other Pacific Islanders$
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Niko Besnier and Kalissa Alexeyeff

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780824838829

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824838829.001.0001

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“Hollywood” and the Emergence of a Fa‘afafine Social Movement in Samoa, 1960–1980

“Hollywood” and the Emergence of a Fa‘afafine Social Movement in Samoa, 1960–1980

Chapter:
(p.56) Chapter 3 “Hollywood” and the Emergence of a Fa‘afafine Social Movement in Samoa, 1960–1980
Source:
Gender on the Edge
Author(s):

Reevan Dolgoy

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824838829.003.0003

This chapter focuses on the development of a fa'afafine social movement in Western Samoa during the period 1960–1980. It examines the role of one particular space in the emergence of the fa'afafine as a collective entity: a tailor shop in the Saleuf district of Apia, known as “Hollywood.” The chapter first traces the origins of Hollywood and the fa'afafine movement before discussing how the tailor shop, and the people who were associated with it, contributed to the early development of fa'afafine identity politics. It shows that the activities of the fa'afafine were not politically agitating or confrontational, and instead promoted a “politics of recognition” that emphasizes the projection of a new notion of identity and solidarity.

Keywords:   social movement, Western Samoa, tailor shop, Apia, Hollywood, fa'afafine, identity politics, recognition, identity, solidarity

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