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Reflections of a Zen Buddhist Nun$
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Kim Iryop

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780824838782

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824838782.001.0001

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In Memory of the Great Master Man’gong on the Fifteenth Anniversary of His Death

In Memory of the Great Master Man’gong on the Fifteenth Anniversary of His Death

Chapter:
(p.55) Chapter 4 In Memory of the Great Master Man’gong on the Fifteenth Anniversary of His Death
Source:
Reflections of a Zen Buddhist Nun
Author(s):

Kim Iryŏp

, Jin Y. Park
Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824838782.003.0005

In this chapter, Kim Iryŏp talks about the fifteenth anniversary of Zen Master Man'gong's death. Iryŏp first considers what we consider major events in life—such as birth, aging, sickness, and death—and feelings—such as pleasure, anger, sorrow, and joy—and says they are the manifestations and extensions of the accumulated habitual nature generated throughout our previous lives. She argues that the secret to becoming an independent being free from the control of our environment and thereby lead a life that is free, unbound from the cycle of life and death, suffering and pleasure, is to learn and embody the activities of non-existence. Freedom and peace, according to Iryŏp, are the very embodiment of Buddhist teachings. She also reflects on Man'gong's effort to revive Buddhism and his role as one of the leaders of the purification movement of Buddhism. Finally, she discusses some of the most important teachings that Man'gong regularly gave us.

Keywords:   death, Kim Iryŏp, Man'gong, life, suffering, non-existence, freedom, peace, Buddhist teachings, Buddhism

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