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Making MicronesiaA Political Biography of Tosiwo Nakayama$
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David L. Hanlon

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780824838461

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824838461.001.0001

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One Canoe

One Canoe

Chapter:
(p.159) Chapter 6 One Canoe
Source:
Making Micronesia
Author(s):

David Hanlon

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824838461.003.0007

This chapter explores the challenges to overcome on the road to self-government. The withdrawal of the Marianas and the increasingly likely departure of Palau and the Marshalls complicated negotiations over the draft compact of free association, and threatened the very prospect of self-government for the remaining islands. There were also the major differences with the United States over the relationship of the draft compact to the constitution as well as a myriad of legislative, administrative, and logistical matters involved in transitioning from a trust territory to an autonomous, self-governing entity. Tosiwo Nakayama urged his fellow citizens to “sail one canoe together through time and history.” In Nakayama's eyes, the metaphor of the canoe linked past, present, and future. The canoe of state, however, faced challenges and changing circumstances radically different from those encountered and successfully met by ancestral and immediately preceding generations.

Keywords:   self-government, free association, Micronesian constitution, trust territory, autonomous government

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