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Gender and Law in the Japanese Imperium$
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Susan L. Burns and Barbara J. Brooks

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780824837150

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824837150.001.0001

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Japanese Colonialism, Gender, and Household Registration

Japanese Colonialism, Gender, and Household Registration

Legal Reconstruction of Boundaries

Chapter:
(p.219) Chapter 8 Japanese Colonialism, Gender, and Household Registration
Source:
Gender and Law in the Japanese Imperium
Author(s):

Barbara J. Brooks

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824837150.003.0009

This chapter takes up the issues of mixed marriages and “hybrid” children through the examination of legal handbooks that were published in prewar Japan and Korea to guide public officials through the complications of the household registration system. The koseki, or household registration system, was divided into metropolitan (naichi) and colonial (gaichi) registers, and throughout the colonial period policing the divide between these two systems was a challenge for officials. The chapter further explores why Japanese women so often appear to be at the sexual divide between colonizer and colonized, in contrast to the dynamics elucidated in European scholarship on gender and colonial culture.

Keywords:   household registration system, koseki, naichi, gaichi, mixed marriages, hybrid children, prewar Japan, prewar Korea

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