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Drinking SmokeThe Tobacco Syndemic in Oceania$
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Mac Marshall

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780824836856

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824836856.001.0001

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Native Hawaiians: Kānaka Maoli

Native Hawaiians: Kānaka Maoli

Pacific Smoke Inhalation Case Study Number 3

Chapter:
(p.179) Chapter 10 Native Hawaiians: Kānaka Maoli
Source:
Drinking Smoke
Author(s):

Mac Marshall

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824836856.003.0010

This chapter focuses on the negative health effects of smoking on “Native Hawaiians,” also called Kānaka Maoli. Among Hawaii's different ethnic groups, Native Hawaiians ranked highest for a variety of cancer risk factors, including tobacco and alcohol use, obesity, and a diet high in processed foods and calories, with substantial amounts of saturated fat, total fat, and cholesterol and low in calcium, folate, vitamin C, and fiber. Research also shows that “overall, lung cancer rates have remained markedly higher for Kānaka Maoli than for the other ethnic groups in both sexes.” In addition, a recent article, noted that cardiovascular disease rates were higher for men than for women and that those with diabetes had four times the rate of nondiabetics.

Keywords:   Native Hawaiians, Kānaka Maoli, cardiovascular disease, lung cancer rates, diabetes, nondiabetics

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