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Drawing on TraditionManga, Anime, and Religion in Contemporary Japan$
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Jolyon Baraka Thomas

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780824835897

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824835897.001.0001

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Religious Frames of Mind

Religious Frames of Mind

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction Religious Frames of Mind
Source:
Drawing on Tradition
Author(s):

Jolyon Baraka Thomas

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824835897.003.0001

This introductory chapter provides an overview of the book's main themes. This book recasts manga and anime as vehicles for the dissemination and adulteration of existing religious vocabulary and imagery, as inspirations for the creation of innovative ritual practices, and as stimuli for the formation of novel religious movements. Making explicit reference to the technical aspects of manga and anime production alongside discussions of narrative content and visual composition, the book illustrates how these elements play important and hitherto largely unexamined roles in eliciting reverent and ritualized reception among some fans. It shows not only that religious content can be found in manga and anime, but also that some practices of rendition and reception can be accurately described as religious. The chapter also discusses Japanese attitudes towards religion, basic assumptions regarding religious form and function that inform this book, and a subset of the culture of manga and anime production and consumption called “religious manga and anime culture.”

Keywords:   manga, anime, Japanese religion, religious imagery, religious movements, Japanese comics

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