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James W. Heisig, Thomas P. Kasulis, and John C. Maraldo

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780824835521

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824835521.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM HAWAII SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hawaii.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hawaii University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 22 January 2018

The Zen Tradition

The Zen Tradition

Chapter:
(p.135) The Zen Tradition
Source:
Japanese Philosophy
Author(s):
James W. Heisig, Thomas P. Kasulis, John C. Maraldo
Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824835521.003.0003

This section provides an overview of the Zen tradition and its philosophical significance. Zen Buddhism was one of the three new religious traditions that emerged during a time of political upheaval in Kamakura Japan, the other two being Nichiren Buddhism and the various forms of Pure Land Buddhism. Zen began with two strategies of development: an elitist approach that sought the patronage of the political centers of power and authority, and a separatist approach that founded monasteries for spiritual practice. There are two major medieval schools of Zen, Rinzai Zen and Sōtō Zen. This section also presents translations of a variety of texts by Japanese philosophers from the Zen tradition, including Dōgen, Musō Soseki, Ikkyū Sōjun, Takuan Sōhō, Suzuki Shōsan, and Shidō Bunan.

Keywords:   Zen Buddhism, Rinzai Zen, Sōtō Zen, Japanese philosophers, Dōgen, Musō Soseki, Ikkyū Sōjun, Takuan Sōhō, Suzuki Shōsan, Shidō Bunan

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