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Transforming the Ivory TowerChallenging Racism, Sexism, and Homophobia in the Academy$
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Brett C. Stockdill and Mary Yu Danico

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780824835262

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824835262.001.0001

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Transforming the Place That Rewards and Oppresses Us

Transforming the Place That Rewards and Oppresses Us

Chapter:
(p.31) Chapter Two Transforming the Place That Rewards and Oppresses Us
Source:
Transforming the Ivory Tower
Author(s):

Rick Bonus

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824835262.003.0002

This chapter presents the author's account of how he, as a professor of color, responds to dynamics related to inequality. He reveals how academic racisms shape the teaching, research, and service of faculty of color as well as how faculty can utilize their privileges and resources to combat endemic racism that isolates and alienates students of color. Within the context of the ongoing backlash against affirmative action, he argues for the need to expand educational opportunities in higher education, “to convince those who think that this quest is reserved for the few elite or those who are White, and that it is only they who can lay claim to such a pursuit.” He describes how Pacific Islander Partnerships in Education (PIPE), a university-wide mentoring program he founded, simultaneously promotes cultural empowerment among Pacific Islander students and provides them with the tools to excel academically. The success of PIPE led to the creation of allied mentoring programs for Chicana and Latina, African American and African diasporic, and Native American students at his university.

Keywords:   university professors, people of color, academic racism, inequality, affirmative action, higher education, Pacific Islander Partnerships in Education, mentoring

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