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Hard Times in the HometownA History of Community Survival in Modern Japan$
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Martin Dusinberre

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780824835248

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824835248.001.0001

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Atomic Power, Community Fission

Atomic Power, Community Fission

Chapter:
(p.171) 11 Atomic Power, Community Fission
Source:
Hard Times in the Hometown
Author(s):

Martin Dusinberre

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824835248.003.0011

This chapter analyzes the implications of the nuclear dispute on Iwaishima. The sense of fear concerning atomic energy, the desire to preserve rich fishing grounds, and abhorrence at the behind-the-scenes tactics of the pronuclear lobby were heartfelt emotions for some islanders; just as the desire to preserve the hometown community through nuclear power was a genuine motivation for some pronuclear lobbyists in Murotsu and Nagashima. However, the chapter contends that the antinuclear campaign also became a struggle about the nature of power and status in the 1980s hometown. The tactics of leading antinuclear campaigners exposed the social and political structures of everyday life, and the extent to which islanders still observed the complex networks of loyalty and ritual.

Keywords:   Iwaishima nuclear dispute, atomic energy, pronuclear lobbyists, Murotsu, Nagashima, antinuclear campaign, power

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