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Purifying ZenWatsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen$
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Tetsuro Watsuji

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780824835101

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824835101.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM HAWAII SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hawaii.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hawaii University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use (for details see www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 17 October 2018

Concerning Social Problems

Concerning Social Problems

Chapter:
(p.78) Chapter Seven Concerning Social Problems
Source:
Purifying Zen
Author(s):

Steve Bein

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824835101.003.0007

This chapter considers what are Dōgen's reflections about social problems. Dōgen does not try to alleviate the social unrest of the secular world by means of secular excellence, since the root of social unrest arises from craving. The only salvation from this unrest is the way of the patriarchs, who cut away the root of this unrest. Accordingly, Dōgen only made efforts toward manifesting the way of the patriarchs. This manifestation is that which allows a disciple to embody Buddhism to the utmost. Dōgen emphasized that to be a monk is to abandon greed for wealth and live a beggar's life. He tells his monks to be absolutely penniless. This chapter expounds on Dōgen's assertion that separation from the desire for the basic necessities of life was a necessary condition for following the way to the truth, along with his disapproval of orthodox Buddhism in Japan.

Keywords:   social problems, Dōgen, social unrest, craving, patriarchs, Buddhism, monks, truth

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