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Purifying Zen
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Purifying Zen: Watsuji Tetsuro's Shamon Dogen

Tetsuro Watsuji

Abstract

In 1223 the monk Dōgen Kigen (1200–1253) came to the conclusion that Japanese Buddhism had become hopelessly corrupt. He undertook a dangerous pilgrimage to China to bring back a purer form of Buddhism and went on to become one of the founders of Sōtō Zen. Seven hundred years later, the philosopher Watsuji Tetsurō (1889–1960) also saw corruption in the Buddhism of his day. In his search for Japan's intellectual past, Watsuji discovered writings by Dōgen that had been hidden away by the monk's own sect. Watsuji later penned Shamon Dōgen (Dōgen the monk), which single-handedly rescued Dōgen from ... More

Keywords: faith, Dōgen Kigen, Japanese Buddhism, Sōtō Zen, Watsuji Tetsurō, egoism, Shamon Dōgen, Westernized Japan, responsibility

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2011 Print ISBN-13: 9780824835101
Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016 DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824835101.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Tetsuro Watsuji, author