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Specters of Violence in a Colonial ContextNew Caledonia, 1917$
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Adrian Muckle

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780824835095

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824835095.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.193) Conclusion
Source:
Specters of Violence in a Colonial Context
Author(s):

Adrian Muckle

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824835095.003.0010

This concluding chapter reiterates that the circumstances in which the war broke out at Tiamou in April 1917 provided an opportunity to examine the place of fear, rumor, and violence in attempts to maintain colonial power relations. War was not the result of an innocent misunderstanding or mutual incomprehension. Nor was it a product of wild settler imaginations, unprovoked Kanak aggression, or a “savage” reflex. Threats by colonial administrators and their intermediaries during recruitment for the war in Europe were one immediate catalyst. For those on the receiving end, threats were heightened by the specter of arbitrary arrest and grievances accumulated over six decades of French colonization as well as personal and collective enmities, rivalries, and insults.

Keywords:   colonial power relations, Tiamou War, colonial administrators, Kanak aggression, arbitrary arrest, French colonization

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