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Fighting in ParadiseLabor Unions, Racism, and Communists in the Making of Modern Hawaii$
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Gerald Horne

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780824835026

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824835026.001.0001

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Upheaval

Upheaval

Chapter:
(p.275) Chapter 15 Upheaval
Source:
Fighting in Paradise
Author(s):

Gerald Horne

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824835026.003.0016

This chapter discusses the victory of Democrats in the November 1954 election. This was the first election in Hawaii after the Smith Act convictions and its aftermath, when the anticommunist declaration was underlined that Moscow controlled the Communist Party, which in turn controlled the International Longshore and Warehousemen's Union, which controlled the Democratic Party—and therefore meant that it too was directed from the Kremlin. Yet despite this propaganda barrage, the Democrats established a stranglehold over Hawaii's politics during this election, in stark defiance of the local elite. Correspondingly, the GOP was the big loser in 1954—and thereafter. The reason for this was simple, said the Honolulu Record: the dominant party in the archipelago since the ouster of indigenous rule had banked on Red-baiting and “labor baiting” and was rejected by the electorate.

Keywords:   Democratic Party, elections, Communist Party, International Longshore and Warehousemen's Union, ILWU, Hawaii

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