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Women's Movements and the Filipina1986-2008$
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Mina Roces

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780824834999

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824834999.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM HAWAII SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hawaii.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hawaii University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 22 January 2018

Indigenous Women

Indigenous Women

Women of the Cordillera

Chapter:
(p.87) 4 Indigenous Women
Source:
Women's Movements and the Filipina
Author(s):

Mina Roces

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824834999.003.0005

This chapter discusses the representation of indigenous women in the women's movements using sources from three organizations: Center for Women's Resources, Cordillera (CWERC); Innabuyog Philippines, which is allied with GABRIELA; and Igorota, founded by a feminist Maryknoll nun. While acknowledging that certain unique aspects distinguished indigenous women from the majority of Filipinas, activists focused on the similarities between highland women and their lowland counterparts. The chapter argues that women's movements focused on “sameness” with lowland women rather than on difference and suggests that a narrative that emphasized indigenous women's similarities with all Filipino women was an attempt to include them into the meta-history of the national lowland or mainstream women's movements. By emphasizing their sameness with lower-class Filipino women, however, indigenous women lost the chance to become alternative role models in the women's movements even though they were mythologized as resistance fighters.

Keywords:   indigenous women, Cordillera, highland women, Filipino women, lowland women, role models, resistance fighters

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