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Regulating ParadiseLand Use Controls in Hawai'i$
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David L. Callies

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780824834753

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824834753.001.0001

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Local Planning and Zoning

Local Planning and Zoning

Chapter:
(p.46) Chapter 2 Local Planning and Zoning
Source:
Regulating Paradise
Author(s):

David L. Callies

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824834753.003.0002

This chapter maintains that local zoning never really declined except in the perception of commentators on the land use scene. The “ancien régime” of land use controls is not only alive but increasingly robust even after decades of neglect. Cities—where the vast majority of people live and work, and thus where land use decisions most directly affect the public’s way of life—never abandoned zoning. While states and federal agencies may have promoted regional and statewide land use management and control systems as an added layer of control upon local governments, these were in addition to rather than a substitute for local zoning. In a sense, then, the ancien régime was not overthrown but circumscribed with the exception of Hawaiʻi, which chose to zone the entire state in 1961 through its Land Use Law.

Keywords:   local zoning, land use controls, ancien régime, regional land use, land use management, local governments, Hawaiʻi, Land Use Law

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