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Repositioning the MissionaryRewriting the Histories of Colonialism, Native Catholicism, and Indigeneity in Guam$
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Vicente M. Diaz

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780824834340

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824834340.001.0001

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Epilogue

Epilogue

In the Shadow of Mass Destruction

Chapter:
(p.204) Epilogue
Source:
Repositioning the Missionary
Author(s):

Vicente M. Diaz

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824834340.003.0007

This epilogue first describes the socially layered and geographically interconnected discrepancies with regards to stories of San Vitores' life and death. It then argues that form and manner of San Vitores' resurfacing in the postwar years features a proliferation of meanings that contrast sharply with the singular narrative wielded by the Vatican, and by local supporters of the Cause to canonize San Vitores. The present study has labored to find alternative meanings in San Vitores' past and present that are neither simply celebratory nor diametrically oppositional. Such alternative stories and meanings are needed because whoever we understand ourselves to be and wherever we end up calling home, we will continue to be at the mercy of those who speak in the name of God and who have at their disposal the smallest, or the largest, weapons of mass destruction to unleash on those who are not with them in their holy crusade.

Keywords:   Diego Luis de San Vitores, Chamorros, Vatican, canonization

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