Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Becoming American? The Art and Identity Crisis of Yasuo Kuniyoshi$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

ShiPu Wang

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780824834180

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824834180.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM HAWAII SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hawaii.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hawaii University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 21 November 2017

Epilogue

Epilogue

Becoming American?

Chapter:
(p.138) Epilogue
Source:
Becoming American? The Art and Identity Crisis of Yasuo Kuniyoshi
Author(s):

ShiPu Wang

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824834180.003.0006

This epilogue first describes the retrospective of Kuniyoshi's work at the Whitney Museum in 1948, in particular its ulterior propagandistic aims. It then discusses how Japanese collectors, scholars, and cultural institutions “reclaimed” Kuniyoshi, starting with the posthumous exhibition of his work in Tokyo in March and April of 1954. As the Japanese earnestly sought to recuperate Kuniyoshi's Japanese identity, so was his status downgraded in the American canon. This posthumous identity crisis is all the more ironic and poignant, considering Kuniyoshi's determinedly assimilationist proclamations, particularly in response to the crises brought forth by Pearl Harbor and his lifelong negotiations through issues of race, assimilation, and national and ideological allegiance.

Keywords:   Yasuo Kuniyoshi, artists, American art, retrospectives

Hawaii Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.