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Imperial Politics and Symbolics in Ancient JapanThe Tenmu Dynasty, 650-800$
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Herman Ooms

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780824832353

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824832353.001.0001

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Allochthons

Allochthons

Chapter:
(p.86) 4 Allochthons
Source:
Imperial Politics and Symbolics in Ancient Japan
Author(s):

Herman Ooms

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824832353.003.0004

This chapter discusses the contributions of “Allochthons”—people who could be aliens, immigrants, refugees, or prisoners of war and were familiar with continental practices. The various domains of continental knowledge were organized through elaborate discourses framed by yin-yang hermeneutics and pragmatics based upon the Yijing (Book of Change). As far as the record shows, yin-yang knowledge came over sporadically from Paekche to Yamato during the sixth century. Its transmission took place with the ceremonial presentations of books and men of learning—usually Buddhist monks from Paekche—to the great Yamato kings in 513 and 553. Eventually, portents started to be exploited for political purposes in the beginning of the seventh century by the Soga clan.

Keywords:   allochthons, continental knowledge, continental practices, yin-yang knowledge, Yijing, Paekche, Buddhist monks, portents

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