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Tour of DutySamurai, Military Service in Edo, and the Culture of Early Modern Japan$
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Constantine Nomikos Vaporis

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780824832056

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824832056.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.237) Conclusion
Source:
Tour of Duty
Author(s):

Constantine Nomikos Vaporis

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824832056.003.0009

This concluding chapter asserts that the Tokugawa state mobilized its elite in an unprecedented fashion, calling on the daimyo to attend the shogun in his capital of Edo every other year, a practice that continued for more than two centuries. In addition, the impact of alternate attendance was widespread. It created economies of service that affected the nature of domainal governance, the lifestyle of daimyo retainer bands, their support staffs, and more broadly the vast numbers of people who tilled the soil and whose labor supported the samurai. The requirements of service also transformed the shape of the former regional castle town of Edo and remade it into a national capital, the vestiges of which can still be seen across Tokyo to date, primarily in its parks and public gardens.

Keywords:   alternate attendance, Tokugawa, daimyo, Edo, shogun

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