Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Death and the Afterlife in Japanese Buddhism$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jacqueline I. Stone and Mariko Namba Walter

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780824832049

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824832049.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM HAWAII SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hawaii.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hawaii University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 17 December 2017

Collective Suicide at the Funeral of Jitsunyo

Collective Suicide at the Funeral of Jitsunyo

Mimesis or Solidarity?

Chapter:
(p.137) 4 Collective Suicide at the Funeral of Jitsunyo
Source:
Death and the Afterlife in Japanese Buddhism
Author(s):

Mark L. Blum

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824832049.003.0005

This chapter analyzes the suicides of Jodo Shinshu adherents, following the death of the abbot Jitsunyo—the monshu or head of the powerful Shinshu Honganji organization. The practice of “relinquishing the body” has always held an ambivalent position in Buddhist traditions, being alternately condemned and valorized, and recent scholarship has expanded on its multiple significances in specific Buddhist cultures. Drawing on both Buddhist canonical sources and the history of this practice in East Asia, the chapter studies the complex ideological heritage underlying the suicides attending Jitsunyo's death. The suicides accompanying his death were acts both of mimesis, replicating Jitsunyo's act of achieving the Pure Land, and of solidarity, expressing loyalty to Jitsunyo.

Keywords:   Jodo Shinshu adherents, abbot Jitsunyo, Shinshu Honganji, Buddhist traditions, Pure Land, mimesis, solidarity

Hawaii Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.