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Eminent NunsWomen Chan Masters of Seventeenth-Century China$

Beata Grant

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780824832025

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824832025.001.0001

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(p.225) Selected Bibliography

(p.225) Selected Bibliography

Source:
Eminent Nuns
Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press

Bibliography references:

Anonymous works, gazetteers, discourse records, and major collections of primary sources are listed by titles.

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