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The Anxieties of MobilityMigration and Tourism in the Indonesian Borderlands$
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Johan A. Lindquist

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780824832018

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824832018.001.0001

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The Diluted Enclave

The Diluted Enclave

Chapter:
(p.43) 2 The Diluted Enclave
Source:
The Anxieties of Mobility
Author(s):

Johan A. Lindquist

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824832018.003.0003

The opening of Batamindo Industrial Park in 1991 symbolized the emergence of the Growth Triangle. Located on 320 hectares of land, Batamindo houses around one hundred multinational corporations such as Philips, Sony, and Hitachi and employs around seventy thousand workers, more than 80 percent women between the ages of eighteen and twenty-four. The park stands in stark visual contrast to the liar squatter communities that surround it. This chapter describes how young factory workers negotiate the spatial and symbolic distinctions between the industrial park and the liar squatter areas, and how particular moral boundaries emerge in this process. For factory workers, the distinction between the developed industrial park and the surrounding liar spaces and practices does not map neatly onto everyday life. Workers move easily in and out of the park and become engaged in forms of life that can be reduced neither to the disciplinary power of the factory nor to an unregulated regime of the liar.

Keywords:   Batamindo Industrial Park, economic zone, Indonesia, liar, factory workers, squatter communities

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