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Nippon ModernJapanese Cinema of the 1920s and 1930s$
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Mitsuyo Wada-Marciano

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780824831820

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824831820.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Nippon Modern
Author(s):

Mitsuyo Wada-Marciano

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824831820.003.0001

This book examines Japanese cinema during the 1920s and 1930s, and more specifically how Japanese modernity took shape in the film culture of the period. It considers film genres that highlight modern subject identity and contain the discourses of Japanese modernity, along with the heterogeneous norms of the Japanese national cinema. It looks at one preeminent studio of the 1920s and 1930s, Shochiku Kamata Film Studios, and how it established norms for a classical Japanese cinema. Shochiku was the only studio that continued production in Tokyo throughout this period of early development of the Japanese film industry. The book thus explores the ways in which Tokyo, and by extension Shochiku, became both the center of modern film production and the cultural hub of Japanese modernity itself. It also investigates how modern Japanese subjectivity was materialized by the Japanese themselves through cinema and how the classical Japanese cinema gave rise to a fictive Japanese national identity.

Keywords:   film genre, Japanese cinema, Japanese modernity, Shochiku Kamata Film Studios, Tokyo, Japanese film industry, film production, Japanese subjectivity, Japanese national identity

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